15-space-age-inventions-and-technologies-we-use-everyday

15 Space Age Inventions and Technologies We Use Everyday

NASA has pioneered many space age technologies and inventions throughout its existence. Some of these have even filtered down into our everyday lives.

NASA has a long history of invention and many technologies created under the program have brought space age tech to the public domain. Some technologies are wrongly attributed to NASA like Velcro and Tang, but many others simply wouldn’t exist without NASA scientists and engineers pushing the boundaries of human understanding. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

Since it founding, NASA has operated under its primary charter to: science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

“To provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the earth’s atmosphere, and for other purposes.” – NASA science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

In pursuit of this noble cause many new scientific discoveries, patents, and spinoff technologies have been created. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

Daniel Lockney, program executive in technology transfer and spinoff partnerships at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C. recently told space.com that “We get better airplanes, or we get better weather forecasting from space stuff, sure, but we also get better-fed children. That kind of stuff, people don’t necessarily associate.” science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

Notable examples include scratch-resistant plastics to super streamlined swimsuits, but there are many more. The following space age tech inventions and technologies are great examples.  science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

This list is far from exhaustive and is in no particular order. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

1. Memory Foam Was Originally Used To Protect Astronauts

Memory foam was first developed by NASA in 1966. The original brief was to make customizable seats for astronauts to alleviate, in part, the effects of G forces during takeoff and landing. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

Engineers soon realized that the large variability between astronauts physiques could cause a problem. They also noted that their body shapes change as they train. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

This would mean, in theory, that individual custom-seats might need to be changed for every flight. This was far from practical and so another solution needed to be found. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

Their solution was to devise a material that could mold to the astronaut’s shape and return to its ‘rest’ state when not in use – hence the term memory foam. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

NASA finally released memory foam into the public domain in the early 1980’s. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

Although initially very expensive to replicate by private enterprises the cost of manufacture has dropped dramatically over time. Today, it can be found in many products ranging from mattresses to sports helmet liners to many others applications. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

Most modern-day memory foam primarily consists of polyurethane with some other additives to increase its viscosity and density – depending on the application. Foam varies widely between manufacturers with many foam formulas being a closely guarded secret. science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science

15 Space Age Inventions and Technologies We Use Everyday
Source: GFDL/Wikimedia Commons science cool stuff science cool stuff science cool stuff science
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